2014 Maldon Folk Festival

November 3rd, 2014 | 'Banjo' Paterson, C. J. Dennis, Camping, Festivals, News, Photos, Poems for adults, Poems for children, Songs, Stories for adults

I have just returned from another wonderful weekend at the Maldon Folk Festival. The weather was its usual spring unpredictability. It was warm when we arrived, but turned cold and windy during the night. Rain followed, after which it became warm and sunny again.

The Poets’ Breakfasts were well attended, and very enjoyable, as always. My impression is that, after the low point of a few years ago, crowds are on the up again. The Breakfast audiences seemed larger this year than last.

Audience - Sunday Breakfast copy

A small but attentive crowd attended for the launch of my new book of poetry for children, “‘The Billy That Died With Its Boots On’ and Other Australian Verse”, published by Walker Books in May this year. Thanks to Geoffrey Graham for launching it for me, and to Maggie Somerville for singing “The Sash”, the song she has written based on my poem of the same name.

A festival highlight for me was the performance of my poem, “In Bed With My Bedsocks”, from the book, by ten year old Tahlia Heggie, during the Sunday Poets’ Breakfast. (Her mother had bought the book at the launch the previous day.) Tahlia also performed two other poems from the book – “Tidying My Room” and “When Eating Watermelon” – over the course of the weekend. It is the ultimate accolade for any poet who writes for children to have a child perform a poem he has written, so for me this was particularly gratifying. Congratulations, too, to Tahlia’s mother for inculcating in her a love of reading!

Here I am with Tahlia (and the book!) after the Breakfast.

Me and Tahlia copy

(Thanks to Maggie Somerville for the photo.)

The Yarn Events this year were held in the Kangaroo Hotel – a first. Unfortunately, rain forced us indoors on the Saturday afternoon. We performed in the dining room, and performers at times struggled to make themselves heard above the waitresses taking lunch orders. The Sunday afternoon was much more successful. The day was bright and sunny, and the event took place in the hotel garden. As with the Poets’ Breakfasts, audiences were very sold, especially on the Sunday.

The Monday Poets’ Breakfast was very much a return to the past. When I first began attending Maldon in 2003, a poetry event was held on Sunday afternoon in the beautiful gardens of Tucci’s, then a pizza restaurant. After several years Tucci’s closed, and remained so for a number of years. It has now re-opened as the restaurant “Wicked Temptations” (with a very smart looking new back fence at the far end of the gardens), and the Monday Poets’ Breakfast was held there. Again, it was very well attended. A highlight for me was my performance with Maggie Somerville of “The Two Bees”, a poem by C. J. Dennis that Maggie has put to music.

Of course, there were many other wonderful events. To pick a few highlights – Geoffrey Graham’s one man ‘Banjo’ Paterson show at the Neighbourhood Centre on Saturday afternoon, Fred Smith at “The Troubadour” on Saturday night, followed by Martin Pearson, and Keith McKenry’s launch of his new biography of John Meredith at the Anglican Church on Sunday afternoon.

Once again, it was a fabulous Maldon Folk Festival, very much enjoyed by all!

6 responses to “2014 Maldon Folk Festival”

  1. Edel Wignell says:

    Delighted to read details of the festival. Congratulations to you and Maggie on your performances and successes.

  2. Yes always a great festival, I trust your book goes to greater success with each festival Oh If anyone from Melbourne missed my ‘Banjo’ show check this

    http://albertparkportlounge.com/

  3. Lorraine McCrimmon says:

    Great to see your blog , never been to Maldon, must get there one year , looks like one great festival , also terrific a young girl reading your poems

  4. Stephen says:

    Thanks, Lorraine. Yes, Maldon has a long history of supporting poetry and other spoken word events. it would be great to see you there one day.

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